Slavery

President Donald Trump arrives to speak at a roundtable discussion about "Transition to Greatness: Restoring, Rebuilding, and Renewing," at Gateway Church Dallas, Thursday, June 11, 2020, in Dallas.(AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
June 12, 2020 - 10:49 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump said Friday that he is rescheduling his first campaign rally in months to a day later so it won't conflict with the Juneteenth observance of the end of slavery in the United States. Trump had scheduled the rally — his first since early March — for June 19 in...
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Officers in swat gear work at the intersection of West Fond du Lac Avenue and West Burleigh Street near a Jet Beauty store that was looted in Milwaukee on Sunday, May 31, 2020. (Mike De Sisti/Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel via AP)
June 12, 2020 - 10:20 pm
TOP OF THE HOUR: — Dallas officials agree to 90-day ban on use of tear gas against demonstrators. — Judge orders pause on use of tear gas against protesters in Seattle. — Minneapolis council takes step toward abolishing police department. ___ HALLANDALE BEACH, Fla. — Ten members of a South Florida...
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FILE - in this May 1, 2020 file photo, James Dunn stands outside the statehouse in Providence, R.I. with a handmade sign. The smallest U.S. state has the longest name, and it's not sitting well for some in the George Floyd era. Officially, Rhode Island was incorporated as "The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations" when it declared statehood in 1790. Now, opponents have revived an on-and-off effort to lop off the plantations reference, saying it evokes the dark legacy of slavery. (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
June 12, 2020 - 11:48 am
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — The smallest U.S. state has the longest name, and it's not sitting well with some in the George Floyd era. Officially, Rhode Island was incorporated as The State of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations when it declared statehood in 1790. Now, opponents have revived an...
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In this June 1, 2020, photo, people gather near the Cup Foods grocery store where George Floyd died in Minneapolis. Floyd was accused of using a fake $20 bill to buy cigarettes from the grocery store. His story is similar to that of other African Americans who died at the hands of police over minor offenses. (AP Photo/Bebeto Matthews)
June 12, 2020 - 10:23 am
MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — For 12-year-old Tamir Rice, it was simply carrying a toy handgun. For Eric Garner, it was allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes. For Michael Brown, Sandra Bland and Ahmaud Arbery, it was the minor offenses of jaywalking, failing to signal a lane change and trespassing on a...
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Police guard a statue of British explorer James Cook as protesters gather in Sydney, Friday, June 12, 2020, to support U.S. protests over the death of George Floyd. Hundreds of police disrupted plans for a Black Lives Matter rally but protest organizers have vowed that other rallies will continue around Australia over the weekend despite warnings of the pandemic risk. (AP Photo/Rick Rycroft)
June 12, 2020 - 9:27 am
CANBERRA, Australia (AP) — Australia’s prime minister apologized on Friday to critics who accuse him of denying the country's history of slavery, as a state government announced it will remove a former Belgian king's name from a mountain range as part of a global re-examination of racial injustice...
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The statues on the Confederate monument are covered in graffiti and beheaded after a protest in Portsmouth, Va., Wednesday, June 10, 2020. Protesters beheaded and then pulled down four statues that were part of a Confederate monument. The crowd was frustrated by the Portsmouth City Council’s decision to put off moving the monument. (Kristen Zeis/The Virginian-Pilot via AP)
June 11, 2020 - 4:16 pm
The rapidly unfolding movement to pull down Confederate monuments around the U.S. in the wake of George Floyd’s death has extended to statues of slave traders, imperialists, conquerors and explorers around the world, including Christopher Columbus, Cecil Rhodes and Belgium’s King Leopold II...
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The statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis is splattered with paint after it was toppled Wednesday night, June 10, 2020, along Monument Drive in Richmond, Va. (Dylan Garner/Richmond Times-Dispatch via AP)
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June 11, 2020 - 2:05 pm
RICHMOND, Va. (AP) — Protesters pulled down a century-old statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis in the former capital of the Confederacy, adding it to the list of Old South monuments removed or damaged around the U.S. in the wake of George Floyd's death. The 8-foot (2.4-meter) bronze...
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FILE - In this Dec. 19, 1939 file photo, a crowd gathers outside the Astor Theater on Broadway during the premiere of "Gone With the Wind" in New York. HBO Max has temporarily removed “Gone With the Wind” from its streaming library in order to add historical context to the 1939 film long criticized for romanticizing slavery and the Civil War-era South. (AP Photo)
June 10, 2020 - 3:26 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — HBO Max has temporarily removed “Gone With the Wind” from its streaming library in order to add historical context to the 1939 film long criticized for romanticizing slavery and the Civil War-era South. Protests in the wake of George Floyd's death have forced entertainment companies...
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A banner is taped over the inscription on the pedestal of the toppled statue of Edward Colston in Bristol, England, Monday, June 8, 2020. The toppling of the statue was greeted with joyous scenes, recognition of the fact that he was a notorious slave trader — a badge of shame in what is one of Britain’s most liberal cities. (AP Photo/Kirsty Wigglesworth)
June 08, 2020 - 1:46 pm
BRISTOL, England (AP) — In an English port city that once launched slave ships, an empty plinth has become the center of a debate about racism, history and memory. For over a century the pedestal in Bristol held the statue of Edward Colston, a 17th-century slave trader whose wealth helped the city...
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FILE - In this Aug. 9, 1944 file photo, U.S. soldiers walk by a bombed out cemetery in Agana, Guam. The 1941 Japanese invasion of Guam, which happened on the same December day as the attack on Hawaii's Pearl Harbor, set off years of forced labor, internment, torture, rape and beheadings. Now, more than 75 years later, thousands of people on Guam, a U.S. territory, are expecting to get long-awaited compensation for their suffering at the hands of imperial Japan during World War II. (AP Photo/Joe Rosenthal, File)
February 27, 2020 - 12:05 am
HAGATÑA, Guam (AP) — For Antonina Palomo Cross, Japan's occupation of Guam started with terror at church. The then-7-year-old was attending Catholic services with her family when the 1941 invasion began, setting off bomb blasts, sirens and screams. It ended with her family surrendering their home...
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