Social diversity

File-This Dec. 22, 2012, file photo shows Pittsburgh Steelers chairman emeritus Dan Rooney attending the unveiling of a marker commemorating the 40th anniversary of the "Immaculate Reception" at the sight of the catch on the Northside of Pittsburgh. In 2003, the NFL had three minority head coaches: future Pro Football Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Herman Edwards and Marvin Lewis. In the 12 previous seasons, there had been six. Total. Considering that the majority of the players in the league 16 years ago were minorities, that imbalance was enormous. And disturbing. And, frankly, it was unfair. Paul Tagliabue, then the NFL commissioner, put together a committee that established the "Rooney Rule," which requires all teams with coaching and front office vacancies to interview minority candidates. The rule, long overdue, was named for Rooney, then president of the Pittsburgh Steelers and the overseer of that committee. (AP Photo/Gene J. Puskar, File)
December 06, 2019 - 11:45 am
In 2003, the NFL had three minority head coaches: future Pro Football Hall of Famer Tony Dungy, Herman Edwards and Marvin Lewis. In the 12 previous seasons, there had been six. Total. Considering that the majority of the players in the league 16 years ago were minorities, that imbalance was...
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Twins Amir, right, and Milo Klatzkin, 3, put on their "I Voted" stickers after their father Barry Klatzkin, left, voted at a polling site in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. New York's first election with early voting is reaching its conclusion as people across the state cast ballots in county and municipal races. With no federal or statewide contests on the ballot Tuesday, turnout is expected to be low, but this year's contests are serving as a rehearsal for next year's blockbuster presidential race. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
November 06, 2019 - 12:21 am
Voters in the West took a dim view of taxes, while New Yorkers backed a new way to elect some of their leaders and a New Jersey city cracked down on Airbnb. Tucson voters seemed uninterested in becoming a sanctuary city, and those in Washington weighed whether to roll back limits on affirmative...
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Twins Amir, right, and Milo Klatzkin, 3, put on their "I Voted" stickers after their father Barry Klatzkin, left, voted at a polling site in New York, Tuesday, Nov. 5, 2019. New York's first election with early voting is reaching its conclusion as people across the state cast ballots in county and municipal races. With no federal or statewide contests on the ballot Tuesday, turnout is expected to be low, but this year's contests are serving as a rehearsal for next year's blockbuster presidential race. (AP Photo/Seth Wenig)
November 06, 2019 - 12:03 am
Voters in some states are deciding whether to roll back conservative policies adopted in earlier eras. Ballot measures in Tucson, Arizona and the states of Colorado and Washington gave voters another say on hot-button social issues: immigration, gambling, taxes and affirmative action. Also, in New...
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File - In this Oct. 26, 2019, file photo, riders herd bison during the annual bison roundup on Antelope Island in Utah. Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. Advances in genetics are bringing the concern in to sharper focus. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer, File)
November 03, 2019 - 10:38 am
SANTA FE, N.M. (AP) — Evidence is mounting that wild North American bison are gradually shedding their genetic diversity across many of the isolated herds overseen by the U.S. government, weakening future resilience against disease and climate events in the shadow of human encroachment. The extent...
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FILE - In this March 25, 2015 file photo, Rep. John Walker, D-Little Rock, speaks at the Arkansas state Capitol in Little Rock, Ark. Walker, an Arkansas lawmaker and civil rights attorney who represented black students in a long-running court fight over the desegregation of Little Rock area schools, died Monday, Oct. 28, 2019. He was 82. (AP Photo/Danny Johnston File)
October 28, 2019 - 4:49 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — John Walker, an Arkansas lawmaker and civil rights attorney who represented black students in a long-running court fight over the desegregation of Little Rock area schools, has died. He was 82. The Pulaski County coroner said Walker died at his Little Rock home Monday...
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Results of AP-NORC Center poll on attitudes toward diversity and recent focus on sexual misconduct;
October 22, 2019 - 9:54 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — Barbara Myers started work as an apprentice electrician in 1995, and over the years she learned to shoot back sexual banter on the job site as much as she had to take it from some of her coworkers. Those days, she says, are starting to change. "I have worked over the last several...
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FILE - In this Jan. 21, 2018, file photo, tourists ride the Staten Island Ferry to get a view of the Statue of Liberty in New York. A new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research shows majorities of Americans agree that diversity is a strength and that values such as constitutional rights, a fair judicial system and the American Dream are key to the nation’s identity. But the poll shows Americans are closely split over whether it’s better for immigrants to embrace a single U.S. culture or add their own variations to the mix. (AP Photo/Mark Lennihan, File)
October 21, 2019 - 3:22 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Majorities of Americans agree that diversity strengthens the country and that values such as constitutional rights, a fair judicial system and the American dream are key to the nation's identity, according to a new poll from The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs...
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October 10, 2019 - 7:43 pm
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (AP) — The Arkansas Board of Education on Thursday stripped the collective bargaining power of the Little Rock teachers' union, sparking fears of a strike even as the panel backed off a plan that critics said would be a return to a racially divided system 62 years after the...
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FILE - In this July 16, 2019, file photo, people stop to record images of Widener Library on the campus of Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass. U.S. District Judge Allison D. Burroughs ruled, Tuesday, Oct. 1, 2019, that Harvard does not discriminate against Asian Americans in its admissions process. The judge issued the ruling in a 2014 lawsuit that alleged Harvard holds Asian American applicants to a higher standard than students of other races. Burroughs said Harvard's admissions process is not perfect but passes constitutional muster. (AP Photo/Steven Senne, File)
October 01, 2019 - 3:08 pm
BOSTON (AP) — Harvard University does not discriminate against Asian Americans in its admissions process, a federal judge ruled Tuesday in a lawsuit that reignited a national debate over affirmative action. U.S. District Judge Allison D. Burroughs said in her decision v that Harvard's admissions...
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Canada's Prime Minister Justin Trudeau addresses the media in Winnipeg, Manitoba, Thursday, Sept. 19, 2019. Trudeau's campaign was hit Wednesday by the publication of a yearbook photo showing him in brownface makeup at a 2001 costume party. The prime minister apologized and said "it was a dumb thing to do." (Sean Kilpatrick/The Canadian Press via AP)
KNSS News
September 19, 2019 - 8:59 pm
TORONTO (AP) — At a time when bigotry seems on the rise around the world and doors are being shut, Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau has become known as a champion of diversity. Now, amid his bid for re-election, that reputation is under attack in a furor triggered by a photo of him in...
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