Special interest groups

This Sunday, April 5, 2020, photo shows an envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. If you're a census slacker and haven’t yet filled out the form for the 2020 head count, the federal government is trying another way to get in touch with you. Starting Wednesday, the U.S. Census Bureau is mailing out millions of paper forms to homes whose residents haven’t yet answered the once-a-decade questionnaire. (AP Photo/Paul Sancya)
April 08, 2020 - 12:16 am
ORLANDO, Fla. (AP) — If you're a census slacker and haven't yet filled out the form for the 2020 head count, the federal government is trying another way to get in touch with you. Starting Wednesday, the U.S. Census Bureau is mailing out paper forms to 65.6 million homes whose residents haven't yet...
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In this March 31, 2020, photo, Kyle Navarro poses in San Francisco. The school nurse was recently unlocking his bicycle when an older white man called him a racial slur and spat at him. Asian Americans are using social media to organize and fight back against racially motivated attacks during the coronavirus pandemic, which the FBI predicts will increase as infections grow. (AP Photo/Jeff Chiu)
April 04, 2020 - 10:07 am
Kyle Navarro was kneeling down to unlock his bicycle when he noticed an older white man staring at him. Navarro, who is Filipino, tried to ignore him, but that soon became impossible. The man walked by, looked back and called Navarro a racial slur. He “spat in my direction, and kept walking,"...
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FILE - This Dec. 12, 2018, file photo shows traffic on the Hollywood Freeway in Los Angeles. The Trump administration is rolling back tough Obama-era mileage standards and gutting one of the United States' biggest efforts to slow climate change. The administration released its relaxed mileage rules Tuesday. (AP Photo/Damian Dovarganes, File)
March 31, 2020 - 3:19 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Trump administration's rollback of mileage standards Tuesday marks a win for Americans who like their SUVs and pickup trucks, but the government's own estimates show big costs, too — more Americans dying from air pollution, more climate-damaging tailpipe exhaust and more...
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Linda DeFrancesco stocks shelves with her farm's own salsa, spreads, veggies and salsa at DeFrancesco Farm Stand in Northford, Conn., Thursday, March 26, 2020. Businesses across the state are worried about the impact of the coronavirus, even the ones considered "essential" like farmers' markets and garden centers. The farm stand opens Saturday at 10 a.m. (Dave Zajac/Record-Journal via AP)
March 30, 2020 - 1:49 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — When will the money arrive? That's the urgent question for small business owners who have been devastated by the coronavirus outbreak. They're awaiting help from the $2 trillion rescue package signed into law Friday. But with bills fast coming due, no end to business closings and an...
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Osvaldo Salas, 29, stands with his son outside their home in suburban Phoenix on Wednesday, March 18, 2020. Salas, who isn't proficient in English, says he's disappointed state authorities haven't posted any information on the coronavirus in Spanish and that he has to rely on friends, family and TV for the latest. Salas, a restaurant cook, is worried about supporting his four children if he can't work anymore. (AP Photo/Astrid Galván)
March 18, 2020 - 10:48 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — Osvaldo Salas speaks a little English, but not proficiently. The suburban Phoenix man relies on Spanish-language TV and friends and family for information on the coronavirus because state and local officials haven't posted any updates online in Spanish even as the global pandemic...
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President Donald Trump speaks during a meeting with tourism industry executives about the coronavirus, in the Cabinet Room of the White House, Tuesday, March 17, 2020, in Washington. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
March 17, 2020 - 10:55 pm
SAN DIEGO (AP) — The Trump administration is considering a plan to turn back all people who cross the border illegally from Mexico, two administration officials said Tuesday, using powers they say the president has during pandemics like the coronavirus outbreak to mount what would be one of the...
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FILE - In this July 26, 2016, file photo, journalists gather in front of Tsukui Yamayuri-en, a facility for the handicapped where a former care home employee killed disabled people, in Sagamihara, outside Tokyo. The Yokohama District Court sentenced Satoshi Uematsu, 30, to death Monday, March 16, 2020, for killing 19 disabled people and injuring 24 others four years ago in the deadliest mass attack in postwar Japan. (AP Photo/Eugene Hoshiko, File)
March 16, 2020 - 7:42 am
TOKYO (AP) — A Japanese court on Monday sentenced a former care home employee to hang for knifing to death 19 disabled people and injuring two dozen others in the deadliest mass attack in post World War II Japan. The Yokohama District Court convicted Satoshi Uematsu of the killings and of injuring...
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FILE - In this March 3, 2020, file photo people photograph the signage outside the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (USCIS) office in Tukwila, Wash., that was closed due to concerns about the coronavirus. The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with symptoms of the illness caused by coronavirus who seek care. The U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday, March 13, 2020, that seeking treatment or preventive services will not impact someone's immigration status under the new public charge rule, which took effect last month. (Mike Siegel/The Seattle Times via AP, File)/The Seattle Times via AP)
March 13, 2020 - 9:20 pm
PHOENIX (AP) — The U.S. government says a new rule disqualifying more people from green cards if they use government benefits will not apply to immigrants with coronavirus or virus symptoms if they seek care. U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services said late Friday that seeking treatment or...
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FILE - In this Dec. 3, 2019, file photo, Luis, left, a migrant fleeing gang violence in Michoacan, sits with his 13-year-old son on a bench in a public park facing a tent camp for refugees in Juarez, Mexico. Luis' family has lived in the camp for two months while they wait to apply for asylum in the U.S., at a border crossing about a quarter of a mile away. The Supreme Court on Wednesday, March 11, 2020, said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. (AP Photo/Cedar Attanasio, File)
March 11, 2020 - 1:53 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Wednesday said it would allow the Trump administration to continue enforcing a policy that makes asylum-seekers wait in Mexico for U.S. court hearings, despite lower court rulings that the policy probably is illegal. The justices' order, over a dissenting vote...
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FILE - In this June 11, 2018, file photo, flames consume trees during a burnout operation that was performed south of County Road 202 near Durango, Colo. A report by the U.S. Geological Survey shows investments made to reduce the risk of wildfire in forested areas are paying dividends when it comes to creating jobs and infusing money in local economies. The study focused on several counties along the New Mexico-Colorado border that make up the watershed of the Rio Grande. (Jerry McBride/The Durango Herald via AP, File)
February 19, 2020 - 4:21 pm
ALBUQUERQUE, N.M. (AP) — Projects to reduce the risk of wildfires and protect water sources in the U.S. West have created jobs and infused more money in local economies, researchers say, and they were funded by a partnership between governments and businesses that has become a model in other...
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