State courts

FILE - In this July 30, 2008, file photo, Jeffrey Epstein, center, appears in court in West Palm Beach, Fla. At the center of Epstein's secluded New Mexico ranch sits a sprawling residence the financier built decades ago, complete with plans for a 4,000-square-foot (372-square-meter) courtyard, a living room roughly the size of the average American home and a nearby private airplane runway. Known as the Zorro Ranch, the high-desert property is now tied to an investigation that the state attorney general's office says it has opened into Epstein with plans to forward findings to federal authorities in New York. (Uma Sanghvi/Palm Beach Post via AP, File)
July 18, 2019 - 1:00 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — The Latest on the sex trafficking charges against Jeffrey Epstein (all times local): 2 p.m. A U.S. senator and a Florida congresswoman are praising a federal judge's decision to keep financier Jeffrey Epstein behind bars. Republican Sen. Ben Sasse, the chairman of the Senate...
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FILE - In this June 26, 2019, file photo, Musician R. Kelly departs from the Leighton Criminal Court building after a status hearing in his criminal sexual abuse trial in Chicago. Fighting federal child sex crime charges is already proving to be a different experience for Kelly than when he successfully fought child pornography charges in state court. A judge ordered him held in federal custody without bond Tuesday, instead of releasing him on bond as before his 2008 trial. (AP Photo/Amr Alfiky, File)
July 17, 2019 - 2:45 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — The difference between R. Kelly's life in 2002 when he was last charged with child sex-related crimes and his arrest last week on even more serious charges was on full display when the R&B singer turned and slowly walked out of court. Each step Tuesday was cut shorter than normal...
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FILE - In this April 26, 2016, file photo, "Into the Wild" author Jon Krakauer comments on his lawsuit against Montana's higher education commissioner in Bozeman, Mont. Krakauer's five-year quest to find out how and why Montana's top higher education official intervened to prevent a star college quarterback's expulsion over a rape accusation stalled Wednesday, July 3, 2019, when the state Supreme Court denied him access to those records. (AP Photo/Matt Volz, File)
July 09, 2019 - 4:58 pm
HELENA, Mont. (AP) — Author Jon Krakauer said he feels "a moral obligation" to fight a recent court ruling against him as he tries to obtain records detailing how the expulsion of a University of Montana quarterback over a rape allegation was overturned. The author of "Into Thin Air" and "Into the...
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In this Feb. 20, 2019 photo, Christopher McDonald, center, who was appointment to the Iowa Supreme Court bu Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds, left, speaks at the Iowa Capitol on Feb. 20, 2019 in Des Moines, Iowa. Listening at right is Lt. Gov. Adam Gregg. Reynolds is transforming the Iowa Supreme Court from one that leaned left to a solidly conservative body, prompting concerns that it could erode past rulings on social issues. (AP Photo/David Pitt, File)
July 03, 2019 - 11:34 am
DES MOINES, Iowa (AP) — Republican Gov. Kim Reynolds is transforming the Iowa Supreme Court from one that leaned liberal to a solidly conservative body, prompting concerns among critics that it could erode past support for civil liberties as well as abortion and gay rights. Through a combination of...
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FILE - In this April 1, 2019, file photo, Mindy Nagel poses for a photograph at the threshold of her home in Cincinnati. Nagel's home is split by two House districts. The Supreme Court said, by a 5-4 vote on Thursday, June 27, 2019, that claims of partisan gerrymandering do not belong in federal court. The court's conservative, Republican-appointed majority says that voters and elected officials should be the arbiters of what is a political dispute The decision effectively reverses the outcome of rulings in Maryland, Michigan, North Carolina and Ohio, where courts had ordered new maps drawn. (AP Photo/John Minchillo, File)
June 27, 2019 - 11:09 pm
JEFFERSON CITY, Mo. (AP) — The battle for political advantage in state capitols is poised to become more intense after the U.S. Supreme Court decision declaring that federal judges have no role in settling disputes over partisan gerrymandering. Thursday's ruling could empower Republicans and...
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FILE - In this Nov. 10, 2015, file photo, Frazier Glenn Miller Jr., convicted of capital murder, attempted murder and other charges, gestures as Johnson County deputies remove Miller from the courtroom during the sentencing phase of his trial at the Johnson County District Court in Olathe, Kan. A recent Kansas Supreme Court ruling declaring that the state constitution protects access to abortion has opened the door to a new legal attack on the death penalty. Attorneys for five of the 10 men on death row in Kansas, including Miller Jr., argue that the abortion decision means the state's courts can enforce the broad guarantees of "life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness" in the Bill of Rights in the Kansas Constitution. (Joe Ledford/The Kansas City Star via AP, Pool, File)
June 26, 2019 - 10:12 am
TOPEKA, Kan. (AP) — A recent Kansas Supreme Court ruling declaring that the state constitution protects access to abortion opened the door to a new legal attack on the death penalty. Attorneys for five of the 10 men on death row in Kansas argue that the abortion decision means the state's courts...
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Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B, right, waves at fans as she arrives for a hearing at Queens County Criminal Court, Tuesday, June 25, 2019, in New York. (AP Photo/Mary Altaffer)
June 25, 2019 - 6:23 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Grammy-winning rapper Cardi B was arraigned Tuesday on new felony charges in connection with a fight last year at a New York City strip club. "Not guilty, sir, honor," said the rapper dressed in a dark blue and light pink pantsuit with her hair tinted blue as she pleaded in state...
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FILE - In this June 14, 2010 file photograph, Clemmie Flemming points out to prosecutor Doug Evans, center, where she spotted Curtis Giovanni Flowers on the morning of four slayings at Tardy Furniture in Greenwood, Miss. Evans, a Mississippi prosecutor who has tried the same man six times in a death penalty case now will decide whether to seek a seventh trial after the U.S. Supreme Court found racial bias in jury selection. (Taylor Kuykendall/The Commonwealth via AP, File)
June 22, 2019 - 8:44 am
JACKSON, Miss. (AP) — A Mississippi prosecutor has tried and failed six times to send Curtis Flowers to the death chamber, with the latest trial conviction and death sentence overturned on Friday because of racial bias in jury selection. Now, that same prosecutor must decide whether to try Flowers...
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FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 22, 2019 - 1:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018 file photo, Pennsylvania resident Rose Mary Knick stands next to a private property sign on her farmland in Lackawanna County's Scott Township. The Supreme Court is siding with Knick in a case that gives citizens another avenue to pursue claims when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights. The high court ruled Friday in the case. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
June 21, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Friday to allow people to sue in federal court when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights, handing a victory to a Pennsylvania woman fighting her town over a cemetery ordinance. The high court ruled 5-4 along...
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