Supreme courts

FILE - In this March 20, 2019 file photo, Attorney Sheri Johnson leaves the Supreme Court after challenging a Mississippi prosecutor's decision to keep African-Americans off the jury in the trial of Curtis Flowers, in Washington. The Supreme Court is throwing out the murder conviction and death sentence for Flowers because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The court's 7-2 decision Friday says the removal of black prospective jurors violated the rights of inmate Curtis Flowers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 22, 2019 - 1:27 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court on Friday threw out the murder conviction and death sentence for a black man in Mississippi because of a prosecutor's efforts to keep African Americans off the jury. The defendant already has been tried six times and now could face a seventh trial. The removal of...
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Women protest after Spain's top court found five men known as the "La Manada," or "The Animal Pack" guilty of rape outside the Supreme Court in Madrid, Spain, Friday, June 21, 2019. Spain's Supreme Court on Friday overruled two lower courts and sentenced five men to 15 years in prison each for raping an 18-year-old woman. (AP Photo/Manu Fernandez)
June 21, 2019 - 2:13 pm
MADRID (AP) — Spain's Supreme Court on Friday overruled two lower courts and sentenced five men to 15 years in prison for raping an 18-year-old woman. The case had triggered an outcry because the lower courts last year convicted the men of the lesser crime of sexual abuse and handed down nine-year...
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FILE - In this Sept. 21, 2018 file photo, Pennsylvania resident Rose Mary Knick stands next to a private property sign on her farmland in Lackawanna County's Scott Township. The Supreme Court is siding with Knick in a case that gives citizens another avenue to pursue claims when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights. The high court ruled Friday in the case. (AP Photo/Jessica Gresko)
June 21, 2019 - 2:04 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court ruled Friday to allow people to sue in federal court when they believe states and local governments have harmed their property rights, handing a victory to a Pennsylvania woman fighting her town over a cemetery ordinance. The high court ruled 5-4 along...
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The Supreme Court is seen under stormy skies in Washington, Thursday, June 20, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 21, 2019 - 12:00 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court says prosecutors must prove that people charged with violating federal gun laws knew they were not allowed to have a weapon. The government says the decision could affect thousands of prosecutions of convicted criminals who are barred from having a firearm. The...
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FILE - In this March 7, 2019, file photo, Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito testifies before House Appropriations Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington.With one sentence on June 20, 2019, Alito signaled his willingness to throw out the Supreme Court's 84-year-old record of support for the broad powers of federal agencies that reaches back to the New Deal. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh, File)
June 21, 2019 - 12:41 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — With one sentence Thursday, Justice Samuel Alito signaled his willingness to throw out the Supreme Court's 84-year-old record of support for the broad powers of federal agencies, which reaches back to the New Deal. Alito's comments and a dissenting opinion from another three...
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Former Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore announces his run for the republican nomination for U.S. Senate Thursday, June 20, 2019, in Montgomery, Ala. (AP Photo/Julie Bennett)
June 20, 2019 - 8:41 pm
MONTGOMERY, Ala. (AP) — Roy Moore announced his candidacy for the U.S. Senate on Thursday, defying Republican leaders who urged the polarizing jurist not to run for the Alabama seat they hope to reclaim in 2020. A former chief justice known for hardline stances against gay marriage and for the Ten...
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New England Patriots owner Robert Kraft, speaks after receiving Genesis Prize in Jerusalem, Thursday, June 20, 2019. Israel honored Kraft with the 2019 Genesis Prize for his philanthropy and commitment to combatting anti-Semitism. (AP Photo/Sebastian Scheiner)
June 20, 2019 - 3:42 pm
JERUSALEM (AP) — The owner of the New England Patriots, Robert Kraft, accepted Israel's prestigious Genesis Prize, known as the "Jewish Nobel," at a lavish ceremony on Thursday, where he pledged $20 million to establish a foundation dedicated to combating anti-Semitism and the Palestinian-led...
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FILE - In this Feb. 13, 2019 file photo, visitors walk around the 40-foot Maryland Peace Cross dedicated to World War I soldiers in Bladensburg, Md. The Supreme Court says the World War I memorial in the shape of a 40-foot-tall cross can continue to stand on public land in Maryland. The high court on Thursday rejected a challenge to the nearly 100-year-old memorial. The justices ruled that its presence on public land doesn’t violate the First Amendment’s establishment clause. That clause prohibits the government from favoring one religion over others.(AP Photo/Kevin Wolf)
June 20, 2019 - 1:57 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — A 40-foot-tall, World War I memorial cross can continue to stand on public land in Maryland, the Supreme Court ruled Thursday in an important decision about the use of religious symbols in American life. The justices said preserving a long-standing religious monument is very...
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June 17, 2019 - 7:56 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Charles Reich, the author and Ivy League academic whose "The Greening of America" blessed the counterculture of the 1960s and became a million-selling manifesto for a new and euphoric way of life, has died. Reich's nephew Daniel Reich said he died Saturday after being briefly...
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The Supreme Court is seen in Washington as the justices prepare to hand down decisions, Monday, June 17, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
June 17, 2019 - 1:35 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is upholding a constitutional rule that allows state and federal governments to prosecute someone for the same crime, a closely watched case because of its potential implications for people prosecuted in the Russia investigation. The court's 7-2 decision Monday...
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