Tobacco farming

Reatha Jefferson looks out over the Great Pee Dee River on Monday, Aug. 17, 2020, Pamplico, SC. Dominion plans to build a new 14.5-mile-long gas line along the river and cites new energy demand spurred by economic growth in eastern South Carolina as the impetus for the project. Jefferson is one of several landowners protesting the pipeline because they are worried about its potential environmental effects. (AP Photo/Michelle Liu)
October 03, 2020 - 7:54 am
PAMPLICO, S.C. (AP) — The land agent who arrived at Reatha Jefferson’s door in May, unannounced and unmasked in the middle of the pandemic, told her he was giving her one more chance. The agent was there on behalf of Virginia-based utility giant Dominion Energy. He wanted to see if Jefferson would...
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President Donald Trump gestures as he steps off Air Force One upon arrival at Minneapolis Saint Paul International Airport, Wednesday, Sept. 30, 2020, in Minneapolis. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
October 01, 2020 - 3:34 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — It's almost as if he's writing a personal check. In recent days, President Donald Trump has promised millions of Medicare recipients that — thanks to him — they'll soon be getting an “incredible” $200 card in the mail to help them pay for prescriptions. He's called himself “the best...
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The combination photo shows, from left, W. Kamau Bell, Yvette Nicole Brown, Common, Lecrae, Mandy Moore and Kerry Washington. For months, actors, sports stars, musicians and other celebrities have been using their platforms to call for justice in the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor. After a grand jury indicted one of the Kentucky police officers on criminal charges, but not for her death, celebrities reacted to the news mostly negatively. (AP Photo)
September 23, 2020 - 7:02 pm
NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — For months, actors, sports stars, musicians and other celebrities have been using their platforms to call for justice in the police shooting death of Breonna Taylor, including at Sunday's Emmy Awards. Her picture was used on the cover of O:The Oprah Magazine this year and...
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Fumie Sato poses for picture in her backyard Saturday, Aug. 1, 2020, at her home in Yokohama, Japan. Hours after she heard Emperor Hirohito's Aug. 15 radio speech declaring Japan's defeat at her school ground in Manchuria, China, Sato had to be prepared for honorable suicide with her family, though her father decided his family must live. Two years later she almost became an orphan when her little sister died of illness after their mother and little brother took an earlier boat back to Japan. (AP Photo/Kiichiro Sato)
August 13, 2020 - 5:29 am
TOKYO (AP) — The last day of the Pacific War was also supposed to be Fumie Sato's last. After hearing Emperor Hirohito's Aug. 15, 1945, radio broadcast declaring Japan would soon be "enduring the unendurable” in defeat, her father, an Imperial Army officer in Manchuria, announced his family would...
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Protesters throw a statue of slave trader Edward Colston into Bristol harbour, during a Black Lives Matter protest rally, in Bristol, England, Sunday June 7, 2020, in response to the recent killing of George Floyd by police officers in Minneapolis, USA, that has led to protests in many countries and across the US. (Ben Birchall/PA via AP)
June 07, 2020 - 3:00 pm
LONDON (AP) — For someone who died nearly three centuries ago, Edward Colston has become a symbol for the Black Lives Matter movement in Britain. The toppling of his statue in Bristol, a city in the southwest of England, on Sunday by anti-racism protesters was greeted with joyous scenes,...
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Tobacco auctioneers wear face masks to protect against coronavirus while inspecting crop on the first day of the tobacco marketing season in Harare, Zimbabwe, Wednesday, April 29, 2020. The tobacco selling season began across the country with auction floors complying with strict Covid-19 measures which included setting up clinics and isolation sites. (AP Photo/Tsvangirayi Mukwazhi)
May 08, 2020 - 4:00 am
HARARE, Zimbabwe (AP) — Adjust Saidi, a foreman at a farm outside Zimbabwe’s capital, Harare, paced through rows of tobacco plants. Desperate to complete the harvest and sell the crop, he pushed workers picking leaves to “hurry it up." Some carried up to 30 kilograms (66 pounds) of leaves, bound by...
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In this Jan. 30, 2020 photo, the Magnolia Grove, an antebellum plantation house in Greensboro, Ala., is seen. The home's entry in the National Register of Historic Places doesn't mention its ties to slavery even though visitors can see a display on enslaved people in an old slave dwelling. An Associated Press review found that many register entries for pre-Civil War plantations virtually ignore slavery. (AP Photo/Jay Reeves)
February 23, 2020 - 8:26 am
BIRMINGHAM, Ala. (AP) — Antebellum Southern plantations were built on the backs of enslaved people, and many of those plantations hold places of honor on the National Register of Historic Places - but don’t look for many mentions of slavery in the government’s official record of places with...
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Farmers protest blocking the motorway near Navalmoral de la Mata in Caceres province, Spain, on Tuesday, February 18, 2020. Farmers in fluorescent yellow vests have begun blocking highways in southwestern Spain with tractors and other vehicles in the latest mass protest over what they say are plummeting incomes for agricultural workers. (AP Photo/Alicia Leon)
February 18, 2020 - 7:14 am
NAVALMORAL DE LA MATA, Spain (AP) — Farmers in fluorescent yellow vests blocked highways in southwestern Spain with tractors and other vehicles Tuesday in the latest mass protest over what they say are plummeting incomes for agricultural workers. The rallies, predominantly in the Extremadura region...
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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., listens as Sen. John Barrasso, R-Wyo., speaks during a news conference at the Capitol in Washington, Tuesday, May 14, 2019. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
May 20, 2019 - 4:13 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, whose home state of Kentucky was long one of the nation's leading tobacco producers, introduced bipartisan legislation Monday to raise the minimum age for buying any tobacco products from 18 to 21. The chamber's top Republican, who said he...
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FILE - In this Oct. 5, 2007, file photo, an American flag flies in front of the Walmart Stores Inc. headquarters in Bentonville, Ark. Walmart said Wednesday, May 8, 2019, that it will raise the minimum age for tobacco products and e-cigarettes to 21 in an effort to combat tobacco sales to minors. The world’s largest retailer says the new rule will take effect in July, and will also include its Sam’s Club warehouse stores. (AP Photo/April L. Brown, File)
May 08, 2019 - 12:38 pm
NEW YORK (AP) — Walmart said Wednesday that it will raise the minimum age to buy tobacco products and e-cigarettes at its U.S. stores to 21 amid growing pressure from regulators to cut tobacco sales and use among minors. The world's largest retailer also said it will also stop selling fruit and...
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