Transportation industry regulation

This Sunday, June 23, 2019, photo released by the National Transportation Safety Board shows NTSB investigator Eliott Simpson briefing NTSB Board Member Jennifer Homendy at the scene of the Hawaii skydiving crash in Oahu, Hawaii. No one aboard survived the crash, which left a small pile of smoky wreckage near the chain link fence surrounding Dillingham Airfield about an hour north of Honolulu. (National Transportation Safety Board via AP)
June 24, 2019 - 7:08 pm
HONOLULU (AP) — The National Transportation Safety Board on Monday called on the Federal Aviation Administration to tighten its regulations governing parachute operations after a skydiving plane in Hawaii crashed and killed all 11 people on board. The NTSB recommended to the FAA more than a decade...
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A man holds a Georgian national flags as opposition demonstrators gather in front of the Georgian Parliament building in Tbilisi, Georgia, Saturday, June 22, 2019. Demonstrators denounced the government Friday as overly friendly to Russia and calling for a snap parliamentary election. (AP Photo/Shakh Aivazov)
June 22, 2019 - 3:27 pm
TBILISI, Georgia (AP) — Thousands of demonstrators crowded outside Georgia's parliament Saturday night for the third straight day of protests that have kindled tensions in the country and prompted Russia to block air connections with its neighbor. The throng was mostly orderly but insistent in its...
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Alpha jets from the French Air Force Patrouille de France fly during the inauguration the 53rd International Paris Air Show at Le Bourget Airport near Paris, France, Monday June 17, 2019. The world's aviation elite are gathering at the Paris Air Show with safety concerns on many minds after two crashes of the popular Boeing 737 Max. (Benoit Tessier/Pool via AP)
June 17, 2019 - 9:05 am
LE BOURGET, France (AP) — Boeing executives apologized Monday to airlines and families of victims of 737 Max crashes in Indonesia and Ethiopia, as the U.S. plane maker struggles to regain the trust of regulators, pilots and the global traveling public. Some victims' families welcomed Boeing's...
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Assemblywoman Lorena Gonzalez, D-San Diego speaks during the Assembly session Wednesday, May 29, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. The Assembly approved her bill, AB5 to to tighten the rules for labeling workers as independent contractors rather than employees, Wednesday. The bill now goes to the state Senate. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)
May 29, 2019 - 11:41 pm
SACRAMENTO, Calif. (AP) — California residents working for companies like Lyft and Uber would get the rights of employees entitled to a minimum wage and workers compensation under a law the state Assembly passed on Wednesday. The sweeping bill, which now goes to the Senate, carries new standards...
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FILE - In this Dec. 30, 2013 file photo, a fireball goes up at the site of an oil train derailment near Casselton, N.D. The Trump administration is withdrawing a proposal for freight trains to have at least two crew members that was drafted in response to explosions of crude oil trains in the U.S. and Canada. Transportation officials said Thursday, May 23, 2019 that a review of accident data did not support the notion that having one crew member is less safe than a multi-person crew. (AP Photo/Bruce Crummy, File)
May 23, 2019 - 8:13 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — The Trump administration said Thursday it was withdrawing a proposal for freight trains to have at least two crew members, nullifying a safety measure drafted under President Barack Obama in response to explosions of crude oil trains in the U.S. and Canada. A review of...
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May 22, 2019 - 5:20 pm
CHICAGO (AP) — CEO Oscar Munoz says he will be aboard United Airlines' first flight of a Boeing 737 Max once regulators agree to let the aircraft fly again. Munoz made the promise after Chicago-based United's annual meeting with shareholders Wednesday. In crashes in Indonesia in October and...
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FILE - In this Friday, Dec. 21, 2018 file photo, a baby is loaded into the rescue vessel of the Spanish NGO Proactiva Open Arms, after being rescued in the Central Mediterranean Sea at 45 miles (72 kilometers) from Al Khums, Libya. A judge in Sicily has dropped an investigation against two member of the Spanish aid group Proactiva Open Arms deriving from a tense high-seas standoff last year when the crew refused to hand over 218 migrants rescued at sea to the Libyan coast guard. Proactiva welcomed the decision to drop the investigation into criminal association and aiding illegal migration Wednesday, calling it ‘’an additional step toward the truth.’’ The group stated that it has always operated according to international roles. (AP Photo/Olmo Calvo, File)
May 19, 2019 - 2:56 pm
ROME (AP) — The Italian interior ministry vowed Sunday to press ahead with a new decree formalizing the closure of Italian ports to aid groups that rescue migrants, even after U.N. human rights investigators said it violated international law. Ministry officials said the security decree was "...
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May 19, 2019 - 11:37 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — The Senate's top Democrat is calling on the federal government to step in and investigate whether a plan for new subway cars in New York City designed by a Chinese state-owned company could pose a threat to national security. Sen. Charles Schumer of New York said in a statement to...
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Daniel Elwell, acting administrator of the Federal Aviation Administration, testifies during a House Transportation Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, May 15, 2019, on the status of the Boeing 737 MAX aircraft. (AP Photo/Susan Walsh)
May 15, 2019 - 1:39 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — The acting head of the Federal Aviation Administration said Wednesday that Boeing should have done more to explain an automated flight-control system on its 737 Max aircraft before two deadly crashes, but he defended his agency's safety certification of the plane and its decision...
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In this undated photo provided by Delta Air Lines, Stephen Dickson poses for a photo. Dickson is President Donald Trump’s nominee to run the Federal Aviation Administration. (Delta Air Lines via AP)
May 14, 2019 - 4:20 pm
Stephen Dickson flew military jets then went on to pilot five different jetliners during a 27-year career at Delta Air Lines that was capped by running the company's daily operations. On paper, he checks all the boxes to become the next head of the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration. But at a...
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