Tribal governments

Clayvin Herrera poses for a picture on the plaza of the Supreme Court, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Washington. The U.S. Supreme is reviewing a case in which Clayvin Herrera, a Crow tribal member and former tribal game warden from Montana, is asserting his right under a 150-year-old treaty with the U.S. government to hunt elk in the Bighorn National Forest in Wyoming. (AP Photo/Alex Brandon)
January 08, 2019 - 6:55 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — Clayvin Herrera wound up with a fine of more than $8,000 for hunting elk in Wyoming's Bighorn National Forest after he posted photos online of his kill, showing off the way showing off often happens these days. The Crow tribe member's defense, however, in a case that has gotten...
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In this Oct. 17, 2018 photo, Nicole Willis, left, a member of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation who lives in Seattle, listens to speakers at a rally in Lacey, Wash. Willis grew up hours away from the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Reservation in the Pacific Northwest, which she calls home. She traveled often from Seattle for cultural events and to spend summers with her grandmother. To her, being Native American means her family is part of a distinct, interconnected community that has existed since ancient times. Her tribe requires citizens to be one-quarter Native American, with 1/16 specific to the tribe, but she said “theoretically, it shouldn’t matter.” (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)
October 20, 2018 - 12:26 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — Jon Rios traces his ancestry to the Pima people of Arizona, but he has no tribal enrollment card, lives in Colorado and isn't exactly sure what percentage Native American he is. He has no interest in meeting any federally imposed requirements to prove his connection to a...
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FILE - In a Oct. 24, 2005 file photo, Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz., greets representatives from the nine Oregon tribes, during a meeting at the Native American Studies and Cultural Center in Portland, Ore. McCain helped usher through Congress some of the most pivotal legislation in Indian Country, including the right for tribes to open casinos. That legacy also includes criticism for seemingly favoring corporate interests over tribes. (Jamie Francis/The Oregonian via AP, File)
September 08, 2018 - 12:23 pm
FLAGSTAFF, Ariz. (AP) — John McCain hadn't been elected to the U.S. Senate when a fellow veteran and friend spotted him at the annual Navajo Nation Fair. "Someone should tell this representative that he's only a representative ... this is not even his district," former Navajo Chairman and President...
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August 25, 2018 - 6:06 am
SANAA, Yemen (AP) — A senior al-Qaida leader was killed in fighting in Yemen's central province of Marib while fighting alongside Yemen's government forces battling Shiite rebels, officials and tribal leaders said Saturday. Ghalib al-Zaidi's death came a week ago in an exchange of fire during...
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In this July 29, 2017 photo provided by KYUK-TV shows a gray whale that was killed in the Kuskokwim River is butchered and the meat and blubber distributed. Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, according to a federal investigative report. The report, released to The Associated Press through a public records, says that after the shooting began, the hunters then believed the whale to be a bowhead and that the harvest would be theirs as the first to shoot or harpoon it. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration decided not to prosecute the hunters. Instead it sent letters advising leaders in three villages about the limits to subsistence whaling. (Katie Basile/KYUK via AP)
August 20, 2018 - 6:19 pm
ANCHORAGE, Alaska (AP) — Indigenous hunters in Alaska initially believed they were legally hunting a beluga whale when they unlawfully killed a protected gray whale with harpoons and guns after the massive animal strayed into a river last year, a federal investigative report said. After the...
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August 17, 2018 - 2:33 pm
CAIRO (AP) — Al-Qaida's chief bomb maker, Ibrahim al-Asiri, who was behind the 2009 Christmas Day plot to down an airliner over Detroit and other foiled aviation-related terror attacks, was killed in a U.S. drone strike, Yemeni officials and a tribal leader said Friday. The killing of al-Asiri...
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FILE - In this Aug. 12, 2015, file photo, wastewater flows through a retention pond built to contain and remove heavy metals from the Gold King Mine outside Silverton, Colo. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency accidentally triggered a spill of 3 million gallons of wastewater from the mine. The Obama administration said it could not legally repay any of the claims for damage from the spill, but the Trump administration promised last year to reconsider. As of Friday, Aug. 3, 2018, no claims had been paid, but the agency said it is continuing to review them. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley, fie)
August 03, 2018 - 3:16 pm
DENVER (AP) — Three years after the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency triggered a massive mine spill that polluted rivers in three states, the federal government still has not repaid any of the victims for the millions of dollars in economic damage they claimed. The EPA said this week it is...
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