Zoology

In this November 2019 photo provided by the Voyageurs Wolf Project, the Shoepack Lake Pack of wolves stops in front of a remote camera set on a trail in Voyageurs National Park, Minn. Scientists studying gray wolves in the park have traced how wolves preying on beavers affect the ecosystem by impeding the ability of beavers to build and maintain new dams that create wetlands. (Tom Gable/Voyageurs Wolf Project via AP)
November 13, 2020 - 1:06 pm
WASHINGTON (AP) — One spring afternoon in 2015, biologist Thomas Gable followed signals from a gray wolf’s GPS tracking collar to a small stream in Minnesota’s Voyageurs National Park. There he found a large canine paw print in the mud and tufts of wolf and beaver fur caught in low bramble. A...
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FILE - In this Oct. 24, 2020, file photo, a Washington state Department of Agriculture worker holds two of the dozens of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a tree in Blaine, Wash. When scientists destroyed the first nest of so-called murder hornets found in the U.S. recently, they discovered about 500 live specimens inside in various stages of development. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File)
November 10, 2020 - 5:11 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — When scientists in Washington state destroyed the first nest of so-called murder hornets found in the U.S., they discovered about 500 live specimens in various stages of development, officials said Tuesday. Among them were nearly 200 queens that had the potential to start...
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Sven Spichiger, Washington State Department of Agriculture managing entomologist, walks with a canister of Asian giant hornets vacuumed from a nest in a tree behind him Saturday, Oct. 24, 2020, in Blaine, Wash. Scientists in Washington state discovered the first nest earlier in the week of so-called murder hornets in the United States and worked to wipe it out Saturday morning to protect native honeybees. Workers with the state Agriculture Department spent weeks searching, trapping and using dental floss to tie tracking devices to Asian giant hornets, which can deliver painful stings to people and spit venom but are the biggest threat to honeybees that farmers depend on to pollinate crops. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)
KNSS News
October 27, 2020 - 12:56 am
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Workers from the state Department of Agriculture managed to destroy the first nest of so-called murder hornets discovered in the U.S. without suffering any stings or other injuries, the agency said Monday. The nest, located in Whatcom County near the Canadian border, created...
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In this Oct. 7, 2020, photo provided by the Washington State Department of Agriculture, a live Asian giant hornet with a tracking device affixed to it sits on an apple in a tree where it was placed, near Blaine, Wash. Washington state officials say they were again unsuccessful at live-tracking an Asian giant hornet while trying to find and destroy a nest of the so-called murder hornets. The Washington State Department of Agriculture said Monday, Oct. 12, 2020, that an entomologist used dental floss to tie a tracking device on a female hornet, only to lose signs of her when she went into the forest. (Karla Salp/Washington State Department of Agriculture via AP)
October 23, 2020 - 12:57 pm
SPOKANE, Wash. (AP) — Scientists have discovered the first nest of so-called murder hornets in the United States and plan to wipe it out Saturday to protect native honeybees, officials in Washington state said. After weeks of searching, the agency said it found the nest of Asian giant hornets in...
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This 2016 photo provided by the University of California, Irvine, shows a diabolical ironclad beetle, which can withstand being crushed by forces almost 40,000 times its body weight and are native to desert habitats in Southern California. Scientists say the armor of the seemingly indestructible beetle could offer clues for designing stronger planes and buildings. In a study published Wednesday, Oct. 21, 2020, in the journal Nature, a group of scientists explains why the beetle is so squash-resistant. (Jesus Rivera, Kisailus Biomimetics and Nanostructured Materials Lab, University of California Irvine via AP)
October 21, 2020 - 10:14 am
NEW YORK (AP) — It's a beetle that can withstand bird pecks, animal stomps and even being rolled over by a Toyota Camry. Now scientists are studying what the bug’s crush-resistant shell could teach them about designing stronger planes and buildings. “This beetle is super tough," said Purdue...
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October 12, 2020 - 3:51 pm
SEATTLE (AP) — Washington state officials said Monday they were again unsuccessful at live-tracking a “murder” hornet while trying to find and destroy a nest of the giant insects. The Washington State Department of Agriculture said an entomologist used dental floss to tie a tracking device on a...
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FILE - This on Feb. 27, 2016, file photo provided by the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, from a remote camera set by biologist Chris Stermer, shows a mountain wolverine in the Tahoe National Forest near Truckee, Calif., a rare sighting of the predator in the state. U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine after determining the rare and elusive predator is not as threatened by climate change as once thought. (Chris Stermer/California Department of Fish and Wildlife via AP, File)
October 08, 2020 - 12:04 pm
BILLINGS, Mont. (AP) — U.S. wildlife officials are withdrawing proposed protections for the snow-loving wolverine after determining the rare and elusive predator is not as threatened by climate change as once thought. Details on the decision were by The Associated Press in advance of a formal...
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In this 2016 photo provided by researcher Connie Allen, male African elephants congregate along hotspots of social activity on the Boteti River in Botswana. Female elephants are well-known to form tight family groups led by experienced matriarchs, but males were long assumed to be loners because they leave their mother’s herd when they reach adolescence. Yet an emerging body of research is revealing the complex relationships of male elephant society, according to a study published Thursday, Sept. 3, 2020. (Connie Allen via AP)
September 03, 2020 - 10:00 am
WASHINGTON (AP) — A line of elephants trundles across a dusty landscape in northern Botswana, ears flapping and trunks occasionally brushing the ground. As they pass a motion-activated camera hidden in low shrubbery, photos record the presence of each elephant. What’s special about this group? It’s...
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AP Illustration/Peter Hamlin;
KNSS News
August 25, 2020 - 2:02 am
Can mosquitoes spread the coronavirus? No. While mosquitoes can spread some diseases, most notably malaria, experts say COVID-19 is not among them. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says it has no data to suggest the coronavirus is spread by either mosquitoes or ticks. COVID-19 is...
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FILE - In this Friday, Aug. 23, 2019, file photo, female northern white rhinos Fatu, right, and Najin, left, the last two northern white rhinos on the planet, are fed some carrots by a ranger in their enclosure at Ol Pejeta Conservancy, in Kenya. Although scientists have long focused on the world’s predators, a massive new study finds that herbivores, critters that eat plants, are the animals most at risk of extinction. A bit more than one in four species of herbivores are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the International Union for Conservation of Nature, the world’s scientific authority on extinction risk, according to a study published Wednesday, Aug. 5, 2020, in the journal Science Advances. (AP Photo/Ben Curtis, File)
August 05, 2020 - 1:23 pm
Although scientists often worry most about the loss of the world’s predators, a comprehensive new study finds that plant-eating herbivores are the animals most at risk of extinction. About one in four species of herbivores, 25.5%, are considered threatened, endangered or vulnerable by the...
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